The Strength in Vulnerability

Since sharing my reality in “The Truth About Our Challenges,” I’ve received a lot of comments from people surprised at my openness and honesty regarding my personal life.

The underlying fact is that I had withheld a significant piece of myself from the world for so long and that part of me just wanted to reconnect with people and let them in. To the degree of my silence spanning four years, I matched it with my openness in one day.

I just wanted connection.

Since then, I’ve been approached by people acknowledging vulnerability and, as a result, allowing themselves to soften and open up, letting someone into their story.

The strength in vulnerability cannot be underestimated. There is a subtle but powerful strength in being you, as you are, and realizing that that’s enough. And, in fact, that it’s perfect. There’s a slot in this world that only you can fill. If you can navigate self-judgments and let your façades down, it’s actually a whole lot more comfortable being in your shoes…dare I say loving them.

I have a huge appreciation for how our perceptions dictate our experience of reality. I’ve found it to be true that everything in ourselves we perceive as “bad” actually has just as many benefits as drawbacks. And vice versa. The things we love have a downside, and the things we dislike about ourselves have just as much of an upside.

I learned some questions I ask myself to balance out my perceptions. Now, I run these across all aspects of my life. They’re just simple questions about the pros and cons, but the emotional freedom gained as a result of taking the time to answer them is priceless. I’ve started working with people worldwide over Skype, asking the same questions to them so they can gain a new viewpoint about their challenges. Perception is the key. Talking with someone who can guide you to find a new one is life-changing.

In a consultation I had last month, I was told that our three-hour session provided more clarity and resolution than the prior six months of psychologist appointments. I asked if she wouldn’t mind emailing this to me, and it’s this testimonial that appears on my website.

The fact is, our reality doesn’t change, but our perception of it does—and that changes our whole world.

My website, the consultations, the mentoring, are about connection. They were born from a shift in my perception about what I thought was “lacking” in my life. They grew out of my silence and my disconnection, feeding the next chapter in my life where all that inspires me is connecting with people.

I wanted to be a mother, and my instinctual thought was that it was going to be to someone who looked like me. When I broke it down, mothering to me was about nurturing, mentoring, and inspiring another life to shine. I feel that becoming a Demartini Method® Facilitator and being able to share the same eye-opening experiences with others has offered me the chance to be my version of a mother.

It started with a few questions to simply look inside and start loving all parts of myself. Then came finding comfort in vulnerability. The façades I habitually held up were to avoid exposing the parts of me I didn’t want the world to see. However, once I’d learned to balance my perceptions and resolve self-judgement as it arose, I found appreciation and love for myself. Only then did I organically let my guard down, allow myself to be vulnerable, and truly let people in. Because that’s where the magic happens.

 

 

*This has been previously published on https://www.sherrie.com.au

Sherrie Laryse

About the Author | Sherrie Laryse

Sherrie Laryse is a mentor and writer, dedicated to living her life with growing self-awareness. She lives by the guiding mantra that "growth occurs as the border of support and challenge." For Sherrie, life is a fluid gift that reshapes itself as we change our perceptions. This is what gives rise to Sherrie’s grounded wisdom and ultimate inspiration to others. Sherrie lives in Sydney. Australia, with her husband and second-hand cat and writes at www.sherrie.com.au

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